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D3ADPOOL
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864 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My gf wanted to get a new camera bc her Canon PS wouldn't zoom far enough(3x). I tell her that I will put $100 toward a new camera if she gets a DSLR, because I've seen all the great shots you guys have taken with them. We get to Best Buy and realize that the kit lenses on most of the DSLR's in our price range are comparable to 3x zoom. So I tell her to go ahead and get a nice point n shoot camera and I will still help her pay for it. $400 later we have the Nikon P90 in our hands capable of 24x zoom. We get home and start clicking off pictures and they all look like CRAP. We both agree to take it back, and ended up getting a Rebel XS for only $100 more and couldn't be happier, as it takes amazing pics right out of the box. We ended up getting a canon 75-300mm zoom lens also.

So anyway, here are some shots I took around the yard while playing with the iso and exposure. Before now, I pretty much just took pictures out of necessity and have absolutely no photography experience or training. These are straight off the camera, feel free to edit them and don't make any nasty comments about my gf or my puppy. I would love some CC on angles, settings, etc as I have really started to enjoy taking pics.




 

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D3ADPOOL
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864 Posts
Discussion Starter #3






I know none of these are really anything terribly interesting, and a lot of the same stuff, but I was just trying to work with the different settings to familiarize myself with them and in hopes of getting a "great" shot. I feel like I'm learning fast but still have a ton of learning left to do. I have also picked up a small tripod since, so I will be attempting some real hdr pics soon.
 

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I call it like I see it..
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13,409 Posts
Great first outing :) I am sure you'll be happy with the XS, it is a solid performer for an entry level SLR. Invest in a battery grip and join Canon Digital Photography Forums - Powered by vBulletin ;)

Now on to the pics:



^ seems a bit out of focus. I mean it looks like the leaves are the focus not the flowers. It looks a bit underexposed too, which is odd considering you used the flash.



^ underexposed.



^ underexposed and tilted to the left..I am told this is common for first time shooters



^Underexposed

For outside stick between 100-400 ISO depending on brightness. You can add ISO as needed but be advised that it will make your pics a bit noisy. When you get faster glass, it becomes less of a problem.

The dog shots are all good :) Just a bit dark for my liking. Try also shooting from the dog's level.
 

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I call it like I see it..
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13,409 Posts





^ The first two are good, but she is centered. Try not to center your subjects in portraits. #3 is awesome because she is a bit off center, which is what you want. Stop using the bloody flash! you have your ISO set to 100, it looks to be a bit dark out. Move your ISO up a bit and you'll be fine without the flash.

The stock flash sucks monkey balls, keep that in mind. If you want fill light, invest in a 430exI (or II if you don't mind the extra $$$).
 

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Premium Member
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4,353 Posts
I wont write much as I have to be off to work now; however, there doesn't seem to be any thought that went into these pictures. They are merely "spray and pray" in that you simply took pictures at random without much consideration to set up or composition. You'll get the hang of this over time, but the best thing I can say to do is just look at other peoples photography, go over the EXIF if they haven't removed it, and read, read, read. These things will all combine to result in your pictures improving drastically and your eye improving and learning how to better execute shots.
 

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I call it like I see it..
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13,409 Posts
I wont write much as I have to be off to work now; however, there doesn't seem to be any thought that went into these pictures. They are merely "spray and pray" in that you simply took pictures at random without much consideration to set up or composition. You'll get the hang of this over time, but the best thing I can say to do is just look at other peoples photography, go over the EXIF if they haven't removed it, and read, read, read. These things will all combine to result in your pictures improving drastically and your eye improving and learning how to better execute shots.
D is spot on. Basically look at what others have done (if they've done it right that is) and create your individual style from their basic technique. Any photog worth his ass follows the basic rules (then again some don't but they are more "art" oriented).
 

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D3ADPOOL
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864 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Thank you very much guys. Yeah, I know I haven't developed much "thought" into what I'm taking pictures of yet, that day I was just looking for things with good colors, etc. I really appreciate all of the advice Mike, it is very helpful, and thank you for taking the time to point out my mistakes.
 

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I call it like I see it..
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13,409 Posts
Thank you very much guys. Yeah, I know I haven't developed much "thought" into what I'm taking pictures of yet, that day I was just looking for things with good colors, etc. I really appreciate all of the advice Mike, it is very helpful, and thank you for taking the time to point out my mistakes.
I didn't point out any mistakes, I just showed you a better way ;) This is art, you can't really make a mistake per-say if you are following your heart...you can however blow a shot and completely frack it up! :lol:

One of the hardest things to learn to do while shooting is to think. "What am I supposed to be thinking about?" you may ask. Well you are supposed to be thinking about "What am I trying to say/show my viewer here?!?" You are simply a filter, the lens is the vessel, the subject is the source. You are showing people what YOU see when you look at something.

So when you take that lovely abstract picture of a steel girder but not what it is attached to, understand that just because YOU know what it normally looks like, does not mean that everyone else will. Basically don't take a shot of the hood of a car and say "This is a stealth." Because it isn't a stealth, it's a hood. The trick is to show the whole subject, but in YOUR way.

Save the individual portions of the car/person for the middle of the series when you've already established what the subject is..or better yet, don't include them - shrug - the subject should be the main focus, not a part of the subject, though it is totally your choice.

Food for thought :)
 

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95 VR4 For Sale
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609 Posts
Your biggest issue looks like keeping the camera steady. I see more camera shake rather than focus issues. a lens with IS will be your best friend, especially at anything past 70mm.

Play with your camera on manual for awhile. Nice thing about digital is you get instant results about if your exposure is right. Read some articles online about how photography works and play with your camera. For example: my dad loves photography but relys on the big P so much that when he faces something the camera cant compute he doesnt always know how to set the camera to take the picture.

Knowing what results your shutter speed, aperature and ISO can give you, and a general idea of what combos to use with available light will help you out tons!

next you should look into some off camera flash. Definetly read the strobist and the lighting 101 you will learn a lot and it will improve not only your photos but your creativity.
 

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I call it like I see it..
Joined
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13,409 Posts
Your biggest issue looks like keeping the camera steady. I see more camera shake rather than focus issues. a lens with IS will be your best friend, especially at anything past 70mm.

Play with your camera on manual for awhile. Nice thing about digital is you get instant results about if your exposure is right. Read some articles online about how photography works and play with your camera. For example: my dad loves photography but relys on the big P so much that when he faces something the camera cant compute he doesnt always know how to set the camera to take the picture.

Knowing what results your shutter speed, aperature and ISO can give you, and a general idea of what combos to use with available light will help you out tons!

next you should look into some off camera flash. Definetly read the strobist and the lighting 101 you will learn a lot and it will improve not only your photos but your creativity.
:stupid: Keep in mind though that everyone gets shake at 70mm+ IS or not. I wouldn't shoot that far out sans a tripod and expect awesome results. I agree, program mode is the best way to venture into the creative modes without using the ugly green box aka auto mode. Nate is 110% correct on this.
 

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General & A/V Moderator
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Wow, a thread full of good advise. Is 3si getting back on track? I sure hope so.

Yea, most of your pics are crap and have that stupid pop up flash burning your subjects, or throwing off your focus. Leave that bastard down. I like some of the tank ones though. I would also say to stay away from dark photography for now. I would much rather see you get used to adjusting your settings and making them work in low light then just going out and buying a flash and burning them more. Get more glass and learn to control your camera in the "creative zone". For now though just keep reading through your manual and get used to the auto side. Then in a few weeks dedicate your time to just the manual side. It will take time, but you will get it.

Ok im telling a story...good luck.
 

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D3ADPOOL
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864 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
^haha, thanks. Yeah, I actually hadn't figured out how to manually turn of the flash for these pics without clicking over to the no flash setting. Finally, figured that out (actually read the manual).
 
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