Mitsubishi 3000GT & Dodge Stealth Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So as per my engine build thread (https://www.3si.org/forum/f42/vr4-back-n-road-flash-ecu-other-stuff-589194/)

I now have my yellow beast back on the road. Its built to deliver ~700AWHP but we have it turned down to 515AWHP in part because we could not maintain decent charge air temps. That said at 3650lb with full tanks 515 WHP (~650 crank HP) its now lighter and more powerful than a Lambo' Murcialago.

So I have started this thread to document my attempts at modifying the engine bay to better manage temps. Plans include a new and modified '99 front end, ducted cold-air feed to the twin inlets and a new under-tray/splitter to increase the airflow through the radiator, oil cooler and IC's.

However, Phase 1 is all about limiting radiant heat from the manifolds and turbos.

So today, I fabricated and installed thermal blankets/barriers for both manifolds and turbos. I used aluminum backed lava fiber material from Heatshiled Products. I used their 1/2" thick material which they recommend for turbos and manifolds and is rated to 1800F

It only took about 3 hrs to fabricate and install. I also fitted a sleeve of Heatshield products 1/4" material over the IC return which runs over the top of the front turbo to reduce heat soak into the IC return air.

The results were immediate and significant. In no particular order:

1) Under hood temps are noticeably cooler and the plenum feels much cooler

2) both IC return air feeds are at the same temperature now. Previously the front turbo would heat soak the front return IC pipe and it would return significantly hotter air.

3) the alternator and the reg/rec pack is no longer bathed in radiant heat fro the new front header. So it runs much cooler and is no longer experiencing heat spikes and cycles.

4) Water temps are noticeably lower in around town, stop and go traffic - I suspect that the radiator was being impacted by radiant heat from the front turbo and header.

Overall, driving is much improved. It runs much smoother in stop and go traffic I suspect that both lower IAT and more stable sensor voltage are contributing to that.

On-boost performance stays consistent longer and my ass believes its pulling stronger and crisper.

I plan to do some data logging over the next week to get some actual data.

Next up will be the new 99 nose - so I can add the splitter and ducting
 

Attachments

·
Registered
1993 3000GT VR4
Joined
·
2,125 Posts
Ive used the heatshield products on my front manifold and both O2 housings. I have not done the turbos as yet but even just what I have done definitely makes a difference.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #4

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Ive used the heatshield products on my front manifold and both O2 housings. I have not done the turbos as yet but even just what I have done definitely makes a difference.
Yes, I should have done this years ago. I made two "U" shaped blankets with fold down flaps for the ends. I left the bottom open so the Turbos can radiate heat downward and still get cooling air from underneath.

For OEM headers and turbos, the stock heat shields do a decent job. But I now have 3SX SS headers and at least 2 times the heat generation. I was also worried about frying the alternator - which I suspect I was starting to do. The only downside is that the SS headers are works of art but now they are hidden.
 

·
Marshall Taylor
Joined
·
1,117 Posts
Yes, I should have done this years ago. I made two "U" shaped blankets with fold down flaps for the ends. I left the bottom open so the Turbos can radiate heat downward and still get cooling air from underneath.

For OEM headers and turbos, the stock heat shields do a decent job. But I now have 3SX SS headers and at least 2 times the heat generation. I was also worried about frying the alternator - which I suspect I was starting to do. The only downside is that the SS headers are works of art but now they are hidden.
I used Heatshield blankets to cover my T3/T4 long tube manifolds. My manifolds are Sterling Silver Ceramic coated. Like you, my manifolds are now covered.

Function over beauty was my priority as well. Good luck with your 99 front clip, ducting and front splitter. All of the above certainly makes a big difference with Heat Management. You provided a nice write up.

Marshall
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
249 Posts
Did you use one of their actual turbo blankets or did you just use the wrap directly?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Did you use one of their actual turbo blankets or did you just use the wrap directly?
Neither, I used 1/2" sheet to fabricate two shields, each shaped like an upside down bath tub. Both are open at the bottom but inhibit upward and sideways radiation. They were designed to work with the next set of mods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hood vent time!

Venting heat from the radiator and front turbo is relatively easy as the area above the hood is a low pressure zone and inside the hood is a high pressure zone - so a vent there should provide all that's needed.

The challenge with our TT platform is that venting the rear turbo the same as the front won't work, because the area hood above the rear turbo is a high pressure zone. Fortunately, this exact problem was already solved by Mitsubishi on the EVO X 0 which has its turbo behind the engine.

So my starting point is to adapt a set of hood vents intended for an EVO IX to my hood.

I ordered this set of CF finished vents from ebay for ~$300 and they arrived today. This is the general layout I'm aiming for.

The will need some trimming before they will sit flush. The first job is to make some templates and order a stock of cutting wheels for my dremel.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,829 Posts
Looking good, I'm planning to get creative with some duct work for my new oil cooler setup this winter. I have tons, and tons, and tons, of carbon panels and ducts I salvaged from my short time in the Motorsports world.

- Something commonly overlooked, is the weather stripping ontop of the firewall - removing it is a good cheap source of venting heat and pressure out from under the hood.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Looking good, I'm planning to get creative with some duct work for my new oil cooler setup this winter. I have tons, and tons, and tons, of carbon panels and ducts I salvaged from my short time in the Motorsports world.

- Something commonly overlooked, is the weather stripping ontop of the firewall - removing it is a good cheap source of venting heat and pressure out from under the hood.
Re- weather strip removal - I'm pretty sure that this area is a high pressure zone - which is why the cabin air intake is located there and why EVO IX's have an inlet there. Removing the vent strip is more likely to suck cold air into the hood rather than vent hot air out - not necessarily a bad thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Spent the day fitting the '99 nose and headlights.

I pushed the passenger side front fender, inwards at its front, ages back. So spent a couple of hours straitening it and adjusting it back to where it fits. Got everything lined up nice!

I got a set of NIB head and side lights to which I added LED's and OMG what a difference over 26 year old headlights lol.

I have sized and cut templates for new SMIC, cold air inlet and radiator ducts. They will get fabricated along with an undertray/splitter while its in for paint and will go on after I get it back.

The next big job will be fabricating a cold air inlet and air-box. Currently, the two filters are pulling hot air in from the passenger side radiator fan - not ideal lol.

Having serious second thoughts on hood vents. I really love the simple flowing lines of the stock hood and '99 nose. I have spent some time trying to design hood vents that complement the clean lines and curves - but failed miserably.

So am starting to move away from hood vents on the basis that:

1) the heat shielding around the turbos and headers have already made a huge improvement to IATs;
2) a cold air feed and airbox should give a big additional benefits to IAT - just stopping the front radiator fans from being the primary source of inlet air will be a big improvement.
3) the undertray/splitter's purpose is to create down-force by generating a low pressure zone under the nose. This will also vent hot engine bay air under the car behind it - which is how Mitsubishi did it originally.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Looking good, I'm planning to get creative with some duct work for my new oil cooler setup this winter. I have tons, and tons, and tons, of carbon panels and ducts I salvaged from my short time in the Motorsports world.

- Something commonly overlooked, is the weather stripping ontop of the firewall - removing it is a good cheap source of venting heat and pressure out from under the hood.
What I did on my last TT before my new one is take the strut covers and put in extended bolts, raising them up a half inch to help evacuate the heat which seemed to work pretty good, then lower them down for the winter. This time I'm going to to with either having louver/vents built or drop vents.
 

·
Dragon Slayer
Joined
·
873 Posts
You want ducting to your intercooler, then From intercooler to radiator and then out of the hood. That rear duct will help blow air over the rear turbo but it’s also gonna create a higher pressure inside of the engine bay and that’s not what you want. that air has to go somewhere and it’s gonna go under the car causing lift. You want a vacuuming effect in the engine bay to extract the heat out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
You want ducting to your intercooler, then From intercooler to radiator and then out of the hood. That rear duct will help blow air over the rear turbo but it’s also gonna create a higher pressure inside of the engine bay and that’s not what you want. that air has to go somewhere and it’s gonna go under the car causing lift. You want a vacuuming effect in the engine bay to extract the heat out.
Understood. The OEM under-tray generates a low pressure zone under the car which sucks hot air from around the rear turbo. EXO IX's have the same set-up but augment the feed with the rear NACA duct.

I have SMICS which I'm making ducts for and the the radiator is already ducted.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
OK its ready for paint.

After trying to make the EVO IX vents work, I decided to go with a single Trackspec hood vent. I tried out 3 different sizes and settled on one intended for a Civic Type R, that looks similar to an EVO VIII vent.

I have the '99 nose on it and fabricated a rear diffuser/undertray so its ready for paint next week :)
20191102_144852.jpg
20191102_144833.jpg
20191102_145147.jpg
20191031_133129.jpg
20191031_133213.jpg
20191101_155455.jpg
20191101_155511.jpg
20191101_155519.jpg

20191102_144852.jpg
20191102_144833.jpg
20191102_145147.jpg
 

·
Dragon Slayer
Joined
·
873 Posts
Is that diffuser at 7 degrees? The most you can probably get away with is 12 degrees and after that the air becomes detached from the surface creating drag.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
279 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
No it's closer to 22 deg. The main purpose is to clean up the rear and eliminate the giant drag inducing "catcher's mitt" that is the OEM set up. I'll add a 2nd skin and strakes later to bring the angle down later. Maybe also a center element to create rwo venturii. For now, this establishes the contact points and what I need for paint prep.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
162 Posts
Can you post a closer image of under the hood? I'm interested in how it's set up for the extraction.

Extending the topic, what about cooling fans for the intercoolers?
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top