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Hey I was just wondering about importing an FTO. I found a few FTO's on the Japanese verison of Ebay for around 4k, but I was wondering how much you guys think it would cost to actually get the car over to the states, and what kind of inspections might need to be done to it and how much they would cost.

Thanks,
Blith
 

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vr4_rider said:
How come people can import in Skylines and not GTO's or FTO's?

Thanks,
Trung
skylines, evos, gto's, etc... are imported in two ways

1) racing use only. you can't register/insure it for driving on streets
2) convert it. companies like motorex convert euro/jap spec cars to US standards, get them approved, and get them legal to register/insure in the USA. LHD isn't necessary...you can legally drive a RHD drive on the streets provided it's registered and insured.

~matt
 

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Me Tarzan..u Jane
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you can import it, you need to find an Importer to do it for you. The thing about some cars that are imported and not able to be driven is that they dont meet any of the US emission standards. I know someone that imported an XJ220 and is only allowed to drive it 3K miles a year. Every year the car is inspected by the EPA and if the milage is more than the 3K limit he has to pay some ungodly tax for it...Might try and call someone like GTPro since they imported their Skyline and see if they can help you out getting in touch w/ an importer and the fees that come along w/ it...
 

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Aghhhh
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Actually you can. You just have to say your using it for ______ and will not be driven around. This goes more for a GTO cause you can always make it LHD.
Customs and the DOT are not as dumb as people like to think. If you say you're going to use the car for racing or shows or something, the require proof of that and they will check up on you periodically.

Might try and call someone like GTPro since they imported their Skyline and see if they can help you out getting in touch w/ an importer and the fees that come along w/ it...
GT Pro bought their Skyline from Motorex. They're working on becoming an importer themselves, but I don't know how much progress they've made towards that end.

If anyone wants to import an FTO, you'll have to crash test a couple to proove that the car meets US standards or can be modified to do so. That will get very expensive, very fast.
 

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Me Tarzan..u Jane
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Gatecrasher said:

If anyone wants to import an FTO, you'll have to crash test a couple to proove that the car meets US standards or can be modified to do so. That will get very expensive, very fast.
The government doesnt do crash tests, they only make sure that the vehicle has all the needed safety requirements. Outside companies do the crash test just so you as a consumer know which cars are safe. I know there are a few cars out on the roads that have failed miserably in crash tests. So that wouldnt be a obstical...
 

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Aghhhh
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The government doesnt do crash tests, they only make sure that the vehicle has all the needed safety requirements. Outside companies do the crash test just so you as a consumer know which cars are safe. I know there are a few cars out on the roads that have failed miserably in crash tests. So that wouldnt be a obstical...
You are so very wrong. The government sets standards for collision performance, and the automakers sacrifice a few vehicles to crash tests to proove that the cars meet or exceed those standards.

There is no car on the road that FAILED the crash standards for it's production year. It may have done poorly, but it still met the lowest definition of the standard. There are independent labs that crash cars on their own, but that's mainly as a way of keeping the automakers honest.

Think about it for just a moment. If crash testing was done simply as a feel-good thing, why would Motorex have spent upwards of one million dollars crash testing a car that they have sold less than 80 of in 4 years? They did it because it would have been illegal to import the car without PROVING that it meets Federal collision standards for a given model year. The same is true for any automaker looking to sell new cars in the United States.
 

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Trzan:

I did the research a while back. Gatecrasher's right. I looked into importing GTO MR's, called a few customs agents and the NHTSA about it. It's just not possible without crash tests.

Here's the basics:
Any potentially imported RHD car will require crash test data before hand, if it is to be driven on Public roads. The only way to get a car into the U.S. without crash tests, is if there is a U.S. equvalent to the car, and BOTH are LHD. The DOT no longer accepts RHD cars (as of 1 year ago) as the equivalent of their LHD counter part. Crash tests are required on the RHD car (so, no RHD RX-7's, GTO's, etc.)
The ONLY way to bring it back to the U.S. without crash tests is to bring it through customs, pay a tax no less than DOUBLE the value of the car, which will give you 1 year to drive the car on U.S. soil. After that you will be required to either destroy the vehicle, or send it back to the country of origin. That is, unless you can take the car to a registered importer (like motorex, Evolution Imports, etc.) and have it legalized, at which point the company will provide crash test data for you. In the case of a Skyline GT-R.... it costs around $16,000 for legalization, and that's if you bring them the car.

Since there's no U.S. counterpart to the FTO, you'll have to do what motorex did, and shell out the hundreds upon thousands (probably more) dollars to have it crash tested before you can even bring it on U.S. soil.
 

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2.0 liter V-6 with MIVEC (mitsubishi innovative valve-timing - electronically controlled).
220(?)ps (~210hp) @8300rpm (redlines at 9K, I think? I know the redline is a ways up there)

Think Integra type-R, only mitsubishi instead of Honda.

Not sure what the torque specs, or anything else are (wheel base, skid pad etc.)
 

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Is'nt the Eclipse the American version of the FTO? I see a few of them here, they are nice cars. Man I wish I could do something to help all you guys out that want to import, (while making $$$$$$$ in the process :D ), it's not easy though.
I want to (and can) bring my GTO back but it's going to cost me to get it converted to the U.S safety specs so I don't know.. I'll see when that time comes.
Is the FTO AWD?..turbo?
 

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Gatecrasher said:


You are so very wrong. The government sets standards for collision performance, and the automakers sacrifice a few vehicles to crash tests to proove that the cars meet or exceed those standards.

There is no car on the road that FAILED the crash standards for it's production year. It may have done poorly, but it still met the lowest definition of the standard. There are independent labs that crash cars on their own, but that's mainly as a way of keeping the automakers honest.

Think about it for just a moment. If crash testing was done simply as a feel-good thing, why would Motorex have spent upwards of one million dollars crash testing a car that they have sold less than 80 of in 4 years? They did it because it would have been illegal to import the car without PROVING that it meets Federal collision standards for a given model year. The same is true for any automaker looking to sell new cars in the United States.
In fact government crash testing is the reason that FMIC went by the way side. The large cavity in the front bumper made it difficult to pass front end collision tests. That is the primary reason that Mitsu has not brought the EVO to the US.

Want proof that a Factory FMIC does this look at the Starion any head on collision and the firewall collapsed and the engine and dash sat on the drivers lap and killed him/her:eek: . This is my major fear when driving the Starion, well that and the engine blowing up.

Is the FTO AWD?..turbo?
The FTO is FWD:( but I think that it is one of the best FWD cars out there.
 

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Aghhhh
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In fact government crash testing is the reason that FMIC went by the way side. The large cavity in the front bumper made it difficult to pass front end collision tests. That is the primary reason that Mitsu has not brought the EVO to the US.
It's not the intercooler itself that causes that. Especially with such a small one as on the Starion. Think about it. An IC is typically a flimsy chunk of aluminium. I could crush one with my foot. I think the main problem is the lack of a solid crash structure. The case with the Lancer Evo is that the crash beam was too flimsy to meet the US crash standards.

(If anyone is saying "Well Evolution Imports legalized the Evos..." please realize that there is a LOT of doubt going around right now about just how legal those cars are. EI and their converter, G&K Auto, has not yet produced any of the documents saying that the DOT actually approved those cars)

With the Starion, it was probably more of a case of the lax crash standards of the early 80s that allowed Mitsubishi to simply cut corners :(
 

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Gatecrasher said:


It's not the intercooler itself that causes that. Especially with such a small one as on the Starion. Think about it. An IC is typically a flimsy chunk of aluminium. I could crush one with my foot. I think the main problem is the lack of a solid crash structure. The case with the Lancer Evo is that the crash beam was too flimsy to meet the US crash standards.
Yeah thats what I was talking about with the FMIC usually it becomes harder to get the necessary reinforcements into the front end.

BTW small FMIC or not its still one of the only real factory FMIC:D
Honda boys like to get the IC from a starion as a way to cut costs on their turbo Civic.
 

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The eclipse is not really considered the Americanized FTO, they are quite different in comparison. And from what I have heard, the performance numbers and weight of the FTO were slightly (ok greatly) skewed by Mitsubishi in order to appeal to more of the Japanese market.

GSX vs. FTO = GSX by a long shot.
 

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GSX = EVOIII

Different body, same motor, tranny, frame, and suspension. ;)
If you really want to dig deep and get yourself an older EVO. Buy an early 90's Mirage. It'll literally drop right in, there's NO difference between the two cars, spare some plastic moulding, and the engines they both had from the factory. A 12 bolt 4G63 will literally drop right in, along with the tranny, and every other part of the drive train.

Back to the issue at hand....

I can list quite a few cars that had factory FMICs, here in the U.S. The 3rd Gen toyota supra being one of them.
Other than that, there's a few reasons. #1, it's impractical from the manufacturers stand point. Why spend $X more on a front mount, having to worry about crash test standards, etc, when side mount(s) are cheaper, can easily pass crash test standards, and don't really hamper the factory performance levels all that much. Increases profit. Also, I'm under the impression the U.S. EVO VII will have the front mount. If it doesn't.... oh well, that'll take me all of a phone call, less than $50, and a little waiting for a package from Japan.
 
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