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red '91 VR-4
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking to buy a set of wheels with slicks dedicated for track only use (road course / autocross, no drag racing).

I'm thinking of 18x11 Volk TE-37's with a 15mm offset and Hoosier 315/30/18 46846R slicks.

I need the wheels to clear a set of coilovers and big red porsche brakes. I don't care if they stick out beyond the fender.

I know the 315's might be a bit of overkill but it's my understanding that Philip of SCE runs / was running them for the road course.

Any thoughts on this combo would be much appreciated. I've been reading a whole bunch of threads on here but am a total wheel / tire newb. Thanks!
 

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1994 Mitsubishi GTO Twin Turbo MR
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170 Posts
Sometimes wider is not always better..

There is a compromise of being able to put enough power to the ground to gain traction, wheel width-weight ratio, and also tyre width-weight ratio. There are also a multitude of things like air pressure, ambient temperature, and tyre warm-up as well that affects a lot of things (but these are nitty gritty.)

Sorry if this didn't help narrow down a specific combination, but just some food for thought on your selection.

Ideally to me, you want to fit the smallest, widest, and lightest wheel/tyre combination you can put power down with.
 

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IMHO 315 is far too big.
I ran tons of track days in the 90's and 00's on stock sized DOT track tires and never felt the need for additional rubber - and I ran rings around everything else available at the time.
Our suspension geometry is a pretty old and compromised design - which changes the contact patch area significantly with pitch, roll and bump - particularly when lowered (even with adjustable links). IMHO It's really difficult to get any advantage with anything over a 265 on a dual use street & track car. Going wider just screws up the scrub radius and exacerbates bump steer. That makes placement accuracy and handling on the limit pretty sketchy. IMHO placement accuracy and on-the-limit handling is far more important on track than seeking incremental increases in theoretical lateral grip, that you can't use.
Dedicated track cars can be made to work with wider tires, but the compromises make them pretty undrivable on the street - been there done that.
 

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red '91 VR-4
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381 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the responses.

So maybe a 275 tire would be a better option? Hoosier recommends a 9" - 11" wide wheel for these bad boys.
 

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Thanks for the responses.

So maybe a 275 tire would be a better option? Hoosier recommends a 9" - 11" wide wheel for these bad boys.
Honestly if its performance that you want, you will accelerate and stop faster with OEM sized slicks. Hoosier just wants an excuse to sell the most expensive options and most get sucked into the bigger is better mindset.
Unless it's a dedicated track car that's competing in sanctioned events, I honestly don't see any benefit in going larger than stock or maybe 255 or 265. With typical track day traffic, I have never been able to run hard enough to keep even 245 section slicks hot enough.
Actual racing is at a whole different level.
 

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That's my goal. I don't street it. It's gutted from the front seats back. I think it'll be an scca street modified car.
Oh cool. In that case go for it but start small and work up. Tire and wheel mass is the biggest performance killer IMHO.
That was my original plan for mine but my wife and daughter don't want me to bang it up and like it as its is lol.
I used to race Spec Racer Ford in SCCA west coast events. Lots of fun.
 

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1994 Mitsubishi GTO Twin Turbo MR
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@Telefonica

I'm not sure how much experience you have with track days (and please read this with a non-condescending tone, as walls of text are quite emotionless, but offering most of my insight), but in the event that it's your first few times out on the course (AUTOX/TA/TT), I would suggest something like 200TW tyres. Maybe anything in the 100-200TW range if you're feeling generous with extra cash to spare.

I know you're not stock, but most stock car classes limit treadwear to 200TW or higher. I guess, it is hard to piece some things together without knowing a full build to determine power and suspension upgrades.

Brakes and tyres are the first things to go on the course, and quite expensive to maintain over the course of multiple runs/events.. If you do plan to get slicks, just keep that in mind, you may only get a few laps out of them. As even the TW I mentioned earlier (200TW), those can burn down in a one day event if there is a lot of seat time available.

Racing on sticky tyres typically generates bad driving habits. Best to learn the limits of the vehicle on "OK" tyres, because it will teach good driving habits (not to challenge your ability of driving or anything.)

That's all I can think of for now.
 
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