Mitsubishi 3000GT & Dodge Stealth Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Money pit owner.
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I have a small garage at home and I'd like to learn how to weld patch panels on a late model car I have and possibly do my own exhaust work.

I know zero about welding. Can someone point me in the right direction with respect to a welder? I've heard of MIG, TIG, flux core, wire feed etc, but I don't know which would be a good one for me. I'd rather not overspend for something that is hardly utlilized, because that will just piss off my wife. I do have access to 240v in my shop if that information is helpful.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
Well there's always youtube, but does Canada have something equivalent to the US community college/trade school system? The community college here offers both "hobby" welding classes where they teach you the basics as well as actual professional welding courses.
 

·
Registered
1991 VR4
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
I would also recommend youtube for some 'hands on' demonstrations. I have done quite a bit of welding, but almost exclusively on my sand rail (repairs not construction), and only using a Lincoln wire feed welder. I have basically just been winging it, lol.

Upfront you need to decide how far you want to take it, and select a welder accordingly. What types of materials you plan to weld will also be a factor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
the cheapest would probably be a older tombstone style electric stick welder then from there oxygen and acetylene with a set of torches then a economical mig welder and if want the best all around would be a tig machine which also requires some skill and knowledge of welding to get the superior results
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
Princess auto.. get a cheap flux core wirefeed mig to start.. and a good welding helmet.. watch a few youtube vids and practice practice practice.. a good autodarkening helmet is more important than a good welder when you're starting out. can't weld worth crap if you can't see what you're welding. For sheet metal a wire feed mig is all ya need.. check kijiji for a hobart or lincoln weldpak or something that you can eventually upgrade with shielding gas if you want something a bit better.. they come up all the time as people use them a few times and then give up.

110v fluxcore mig is all ya really need until you start welding plate steel.. then pickup a cheap 220v stick welder.
 

·
Money pit owner.
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
thanks guys for the advice! I will check out youtube vids and there is a vocational college here I could check on courses too.
I'm budgetting up to $1000 so I'm thinking that should be enough to get me going.
 

·
One fix at a time
Joined
·
7,896 Posts
You can get some really good cheap china welders that do well. A MIG welder with .023-.025” wire is what you will want for bodywork. Anything bigger and you’re going to have issues with blow through or warping from the weld being too hot. For a couple hundred you can get a 110/220V mig welder or a mig/tig/stick combo machine. Go on Amazon and start reading some of the reviews. You don’t need to spend big bucks to get a decent machine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
Once I was in your shoes too so i am sure this is your best choice; get the " HF Titanium flux125 " cost $199 goes on sale regularly to $169 and on big holidays like the ones that are coming i heard people get them for $159, so it's the best on price but not just that, it's really small and light, doesn't take space and can carry it around, but can weld like a big machine, it's a DC inverter so packs more heat and welds don't splatter as much as ac, has two infinity controls so you can fine tune it to your needs, no like other cheap ones with a high and low switch, with a double side weld you can join up to 1/4" inch plenty for house and car use and it's 120v, unless you plan to weld medium to high thickness materials a good 120v it's all you need.

The best part is you don't need training/school for it, just open the box, read and study the instructions ( it even have some pages showing you some welds and the correct way to do it), after that watch some you tube videos and just practice and practice.

Type Titanium flux125 on YouTube and you'll see that everybody likes it even the guys that have bigger equipment like mig or tig cos it's light and small and can weld outside in windy conditions. This is a welder that even later on when you learn all about welding you'll still like and use often.

As you can see this is the best to start and later on when you know about welding you can get a bigger machine with the money you'll save.

Did you know that for a Mig you need a gas tanks for welding so you need to have a welding store nearby, setup its a little more complicated too, and for tig well you do need some classes cos there are way more things to have in account to weld (needs a welding gas tank too). And those machines are more expensive for something you may not use that often.

Here is a video showing a weld , here welding exhaust pipe, here welding thickness test , and here comparing it to a lincoln electric fc-90.
 

·
Money pit owner.
Joined
·
2,739 Posts
Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
thanks guys for the advice!

I spent about an hour watching "MIG for beginner" videos on youtube and I didn't even get to the other type of welders lol

It seems you can get MIG with flux core wire that doesn't need the argon/co2 gas too, but the MIG with gas gave a cleaner weld.

I hadn't even considered a stick welder because I want to replicate the factory spot welds on body panels if I can.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,783 Posts
thanks guys for the advice!

I spent about an hour watching "MIG for beginner" videos on youtube and I didn't even get to the other type of welders lol

It seems you can get MIG with flux core wire that doesn't need the argon/co2 gas too, but the MIG with gas gave a cleaner weld.

I hadn't even considered a stick welder because I want to replicate the factory spot welds on body panels if I can.
With practice you can get good wells with flux core too but of course mig is better looking, but you have to get ready to have a big tank of gas.

The more comon welds type are stick, flux core, mig, & tig.
Flux core is not mig, yes lots of people call it mig flux but really it's just flux core, literately mig stands for metal inert gas.

If your main goal it's great looking welds and just that then MIG is what you should be looking for, but just make sure you get one that can do flux core as well, nowadays many do but make sure of it, i think some older models don't have flux.

Edit : Also if this apply to you; you can get one that can take 120 & 240v would be great for if you ever take your welder to places where you just have 120v.
 

·
Registered
1991 VR4
Joined
·
1,097 Posts
thanks guys for the advice!

I spent about an hour watching "MIG for beginner" videos on youtube and I didn't even get to the other type of welders lol

It seems you can get MIG with flux core wire that doesn't need the argon/co2 gas too, but the MIG with gas gave a cleaner weld.

I hadn't even considered a stick welder because I want to replicate the factory spot welds on body panels if I can.
I replaced the entire front end on my car (headlight bucket/radiator support piece included - you used to be able to get these from mitsubishi) which included drilling out all those spot wells and then re-doing them. Did that with a basic wire feed lincoln welder, no gas or anything. The spot welds look just like factory. One of the keys to cleaning with any welder is getting the surfaces extremely clean to prevent splatter.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top